Create  性犯罪ニュース  Index  Search  Changes  RSS  Note  wikifarm  Login

親密に

$Id: Closer,v 1.7 2004/12/13 22:23:59 www-data Exp $

CLOSER

Greg Egan

グレッグ・イーガン

 

Nobody wants to spend eternity alone.

誰も永遠に孤独ではいられない。

("Intimacy," I once told Sian, after we'd made love, "is the only cure for solipsism." She laughed and said, "Don't get too ambitious, Michael. So far, it hasn't even cured me of masturbation.")

(「親密に交わること」以前、愛し合った後でシアンに言ったことがある、「それだけが唯我論を克服する唯一の方法だ」。だけど彼女は笑って言った。「浮気はだめよ、マイケル。今のところ、わたしの欲求不満さえ克服できてないわ」)

True solipsism, though, was never my problem. From the very first time I considered the question, I accepted that there could be no way of proving the reality of an external world, let alone the existence of other minds - but I also accepted that taking both on faith was the only practical way of dealing with everyday life.

でも、純粋な唯我論がぼくにとって問題になったことはない。そういう疑問を最初に考えついたときから、たぶん自分の外部に世界が実在していることを証明する方法はなくて、もちろん他者に心が存在していることを証明する方法もないと認めていたからだ。それでもぼくは、そういうものが存在していると信じることが日々の生活をうまくやっていく唯一の現実的な方法であるということを受け入れていた。

The question which obsessed me was this: Assuming that other people existed, how did they apprehend that existence? How did they experience being? Could I ever truly understand what consciousness was like for another person - any more than I could for an ape, or a cat, or an insect?

ぼくの頭から離れない疑問はこのことだ。もし他人というものが存在するとするなら、彼らはどんなふうにその存在を理解しているのだろう?どんなふうに存在するということを体験しているのだろう?他人の意識とは一体何なのか本当の意味で理解することはできるのだろうか?猿の、あるいは猫の、もしくは昆虫のそれを理解するという以上に。

If not, I was alone.

もしできないのなら、ぼくは孤独だ。

I desperately wanted to believe that other people were somehow knowable, but it wasn't something I could bring myself to take for granted. I knew there could be no absolute proof, but I wanted to be persuaded, I needed to be compelled.

ぼくは是が非でも他人とはどうかすれば理解できるものだと考えたかった。だけど、それはぼくにとってちっとも当たり前のことじゃなかった。完全な証拠なんてないということはわかりきっている。だけど、ぼくは説得されたかった。無理矢理にでもそう思い込まされたかった。

 

No literature, no poetry, no drama, however personally resonant I found it, could ever quite convince me that I'd glimpsed the author's soul. Language had evolved to facilitate cooperation in the conquest of the physical world, not to describe subjective reality. Love, anger, jealousy, resentment, grief - all were defined, ultimately, in terms of external circumstances and observable actions. When an image or metaphor rang true for me, it proved only that I shared with the author a set of definitions, a culturally sanctioned list of word associations. After all, many publishers used computer programs - remotest possibility of self-awareness - to routinely produce both literature, and literary criticism, indistinguishable from the human product. Not just formularised garbage, either; on several occasions, I'd been deeply affected by works which I'd later discovered had been cranked out by unthinking software. This didn't prove that human literature communicated nothing of the author's inner life, but it certainly made clear how much room there was for doubt.

文学にも、詩作にも、戯曲にも、個人的に琴線に触れるものはあったのだけれど、作者の魂を少しでも見たと思わせてくれるものは無かった。言語というものは確立した物理世界との協調を円滑にするために発展したのであって、主観的な現実を記述するために発展したのではなかったからだ。愛、怒り、妬み、恨み、悲しみ――全て外部の状況と、客観的な行動による言葉によって完璧に定義されている。ある心象や隠喩が正しいと思ったとしても、それは単に、一連の定義、つまり、ある文化において認められる互いに関連した言葉のリストを、作者と共有したということを示しているに過ぎないのだ。結局のところ、多くの出版社は文学と文学批評の両方を、プログラム――非常に特化してはいるが、あまり洗練されていないアルゴリズムであり、自意識などとうてい持ち得ない――を使って、一定の手順によって生成しているのだが、それらが人間の手によるものかそうでないかはわからない。そして、ただの定式化されたクズとも。ぼくが心から感銘を受けた作品が、後になって自分で考えることのできないソフトウェアによって出力されたものだとわかったことが何度もあった。だからといって人間の作った作品は作者の心とまったく関係がない、ということはできないのだけれど、少なくとも疑いの余地があることははっきりしている。

Unlike many of my friends, I had no qualms whatsoever when, at the age of eighteen, the time came for me to "switch." My organic brain was removed and discarded, and control of my body handed over to my "jewel" - the Ndoli Device, a neural-net computer implanted shortly after birth, which had since learnt to imitate my brain, down to the level of individual neurons. I had no qualms, not because I was at all convinced that the jewel and the brain experienced consciousness identically, but because, from an early age, I'd identified myself solely with the jewel. My brain was a kind of bootstrap device, nothing more, and to mourn its loss would have been as absurd as mourning my emergence from some primitive stage of embryological neural development. Switching was simply what humans did now, an established part of the life cycle, even if it was mediated by our culture, and not by our genes.

友人たちの多くとは違って、十八歳になって<スイッチ>する時期がやってきたときにぼくは何の躊躇もしなかった。ぼくの有機脳は切除、廃棄され、身体のコントロール権は<宝石>の手に渡った。エンドーリ装置、誕生してすぐに埋め込まれる神経網コンピュータであり、埋め込まれたときからぼくの脳を個々のニューロンのレベルで模倣するよう学習している。ぼくが躊躇しなかったのは、宝石と脳はまったく同一の意識を体験するだろうと悟っていたから、ではなくて、幼いうちから自分自身と宝石はひとつのものだと考えていたからだ。脳とはブートストラップデバイスの一種であって、それ以上のものではない。それが失われるのを嘆くのは、発生学的な神経網発達の、ある初期段階における発現を嘆くのと同じくらい馬鹿げたことに違いない。スイッチすることは単に人類が今現在おこなっていることであって、それはもうライフサイクルとして確立しているものなのだ。たとえそれが文明の手によるもので、遺伝子の手によるものではないとしても。

Seeing each other die, and observing the gradual failure of their own bodies, may have helped convince pre-Ndoli humans of their common humanity; certainly, there were countless references in their literature to the equalising power of death. Perhaps concluding that the universe would go on without them produced a shared sense of hopelessness, or insignificance, which they viewed as their defining attribute.

お互いが死ぬのを目撃したり、肉体がだんだんと欠陥を抱えていくのを見守ったりするのは、前エンドーリ世代の人間性をわかってあげるのに役立ったのかもしれない。実際、この世代の文献には数え切れないほど、死というものの持つ力を均一化するような言及があるのだ。おそらく宇宙が自分たち抜きでも存在し続けると結論づけたことが、これらに共通する絶望や無意義の感覚を生み出していたのだろう。それが自分たちの不変の属性だと彼らは見なしていたのだ。

Now that it's become an article of faith that, sometime in the next few billion years, physicists will find a way for us to go on without the universe, rather than vice versa, that route to spiritual equality has lost whatever dubious logic it might ever have possessed.

今や確かなものになりつつあるのは、いつか次の二、三十億年後には物理学者たちが、ぼくたち宇宙抜きで存在させる方法を見付けるだろうということだ。そして、その逆もまた真というよりは、このことがもたらす心情的な等価性が、ぼくたちが過去に固執していたようなあらゆる疑わしい論理を消し去ってしまったのだ。

 

Sian was a communications engineer. I was a holovision news editor. We met during a live broadcast of the seeding of Venus with terraforming nanomachines - a matter of great public interest, since most of the planet's as-yet-uninhabitable surface had already been sold. There were several technical glitches with the broadcast which might have been disastrous, but together we managed to work around them, and even to hide the seams. It was nothing special, we were simply doing our jobs, but afterwards I was elated out of all proportion. It took me twenty-four hours to realise (or decide) that I'd fallen in love.

シアンは通信技術者だ。ぼくはホロビジョンのニュース編集者。ぼくたちが出会ったのは、金星のテラフォーミング――これは莫大な公益をもたらす一大事業だ。未だ居住不可能であるにもかかわらず惑星表面のほとんどが売りに出されていた――のためにナノマシンを蒔くところを生放送するときだった。このとき、放送を台無しにしかねない技術的な事故が何度も起こったが、ぼくたちは一緒になって事故に取り組み、シーンのつなぎ目さえ隠せるようになった。別に特別なことをした訳じゃない。単に自分たちの仕事をしただけだ。だが全てが終ると、ぼくは動揺していた。二十四時間たってやっと気づいた(あるいは、こう決心した)。ぼくは恋に落ちたのだと。

However, when I approached her the next day, she made it clear that she felt nothing for me; the chemistry I'd imagined "between us" had all been in my head. I was dismayed, but not surprised. Work didn't bring us together again, but I called her occasionally, and six weeks later my persistence was rewarded. I took her to a performance of Waiting for Godot by augmented parrots, and I enjoyed myself immensely, but I didn't see her again for more than a month.

ところが、次の日近づいてみると彼女はぼくに何の感情も抱いてないと明かしてくれた。空想していたような<二人の相性>なんてものは、完全にぼくの頭のなかだけのものだったのだ。落胆はしたが驚くようなことじゃない。もう一度一緒に仕事をすることはなかったので、ぼくは彼女にちょくちょく映話を入れていたのだけど、六週間後にとうとうしびれを切らした。ぼくは機能強化したオウムによる「ゴドーを待ちながら」の上演に彼女を連れて行ったのだ。ところが、ぼくは非常に満足したというのに、その後一ヶ月以上も彼女に会えなくなってしまった。

I'd almost given up hope, when she appeared at my door without warning one night and dragged me along to a "concert" of interactive computerised improvisation. The "audience" was assembled in what looked like a mock-up of a Berlin nightclub of the 2050s. A computer program, originally designed for creating movie scores, was fed with the image from a hover-camera which wandered about the set. People danced and sang, screamed and brawled, and engaged in all kinds of histrionics in the hope of attracting the camera and shaping the music. At first, I felt cowed and inhibited, but Sian gave me no choice but to join in.

もうほとんど諦めかけていたその時、彼女がぼくの玄関の前にあらわれ、まる一晩かかるということも告げずにぼくを相互作用電子即興作品の<コンサート>に連れ出した。そこでは<オーディエンス>たちはまるで二○五○年代のベルリンのナイトクラブを実物大模型で再現したような場所に集められる。映像の譜面を生成するように組まれたプログラムに、このセット中をふわふわと漂うホバー・カメラからのイメージが与えられ、人間はその中で踊ったり歌ったり、叫んだり怒鳴りあったりして、この演劇における様々な役を演じるわけだ。カメラが近づいて音楽が形を成すのを期待しながら。はじめのうちぼくは震え上がってしまい、逃げ出したくて仕方がなかったけれど、シアンは参加するほか選択肢をくれなかった。

It was chaotic, insane, at times even terrifying. One woman stabbed another to "death" at the table beside us, which struck me as a sickening (and expensive) indulgence, but when a riot broke out at the end, and people started smashing the deliberately flimsy furniture, I followed Sian into the melee, cheering.

こいつはまったくムチャクチャでイカレれていて、怖ろしい場面すら何度もあった。一人の女性がぼくたちのテーブルの横にいた別の女性を<死>で突き刺したの見て、ぼくはこの病的な(そして高価な)娯楽にすっかり打ちのめされてしまった。だけど、終盤になって大騒ぎが収まり、皆がわざと壊れやすくしてある舞台セットを壊しはじめる頃になると、ぼくはシアンに導かれてこの混乱に加わった。喜びの声を上げながら。

The music - the excuse for the whole event - was garbage, but I didn't really care. When we limped out into the night, bruised and aching and laughing, I knew that at least we'd shared something that had made us feel closer. She took me home and we went to bed together, too sore and tired to do more than sleep, but when we made love in the morning I already felt so at ease with her that I could hardly believe it was our first time.

音楽――これがイベントであるという言い訳――はゴミカスだったが、そんなのはどうだっていい。皆がヨロヨロとした足取りで、あざや痛みをこらえつつ、笑いながら夜中の会場を後にするのを見たとき、ぼくは思った。ぼくたちは少なくとも何か自分たちをより親密にしてくれるものを共有したのだ、と。シアンはぼくを家に連れて帰らせ、ベッドを共にしてくれた。筋肉が痛み、身体はとても疲れていたのでそのときは眠る以上のことはできなかったのだけれど、朝になってセックスをした後、ぼくは自分が彼女と一緒にいると、もう既にとても寛いでいられるということに気がついた。これが二人の初めてのこととは、とても信じられなかった。

Soon we were inseparable. My tastes in entertainment were very different from hers, but I survived most of her favourite "artforms", more or less intact. She moved into my apartment, at my suggestion, and casually destroyed the orderly rhythms of my carefully arranged domestic life.

ぼくたちはすぐに離れられなくなった。ぼくの娯楽の嗜好は彼女のものとはまったく違っていたのだけれど、彼女の好む<芸術形式>にはなんとか無傷のままで耐えることができた。彼女はぼくの提案によってアパートに引越して来てくれ、ぼくが入念に構築した内向的な生活が生み出す決まりきったリズムを打ち壊してくれた。

I had to piece together details of her past from throwaway lines; she found it far too boring to sit down and give me a coherent account. Her life had been as unremarkable as mine: she'd grown up in a suburban, middle-class family, studied her profession, found a job. Like almost everyone, she'd switched at eighteen. She had no strong political convictions. She was good at her work, but put ten times more energy into her social life. She was intelligent, but hated anything overtly intellectual. She was impatient, aggressive, roughly affectionate.

シアンの過去の詳しいところを知るには、彼女がさりげなく発した言葉をつなぎ合わせていくしかなかった。彼女にとってゆっくりと腰を下ろして筋道立った話をするのは、あまりにも退屈なことだったからだ。彼女の人生もぼくと同じように特別なものはなにもなかった。郊外の中流階級の家庭で育ち、職業について学び、仕事をみつけた。他の皆と同じように十八歳でスイッチしている。政治について強固な信念はない。仕事は好きだが、その十倍のエネルギーを社交面に注いでいる。自身は知的ではあるが、あからさまに知をひけらかすものは大嫌いである。飽きっぽくて活発で、だいたいのところは愛情豊かである、と。

And I could not, for one second, imagine what it was like inside her head.

そしてぼくは、彼女の頭の中で何が起こっているのか、一秒たりとも想像することができなかった。

For a start, I rarely had any idea what she was thinking - in the sense of knowing how she would have replied if asked, out of the blue, to describe her thoughts at the moment before they were interrupted by the question. On a longer time scale, I had no feeling for her motivation, her image of herself, her concept of who she was and what she did and why. Even in the laughably crude sense that a novelist pretends to "explain" a character, I could not have explained Sian.

最初の頃は、シアンが何を考えているのか全然わからなかった――これは、不意に今、何を考えていたのかと尋ねても、彼女がどう答えるかわからないという意味でだ。かなり長い間、ぼくは彼女の動機やセルフメージ、自分自身とは誰であり、何を、どうしてするのか、といった概念を感じることすら出来なかった。小説家がキャラクターを“描写”したつもりでいるような、笑ってしまうほどいい加減な意味でさえも、彼女を描写することはぼくにはできなかった。

And if she'd provided me with a running commentary on her mental state, and a weekly assessment of the reasons for her actions in the latest psychodynamic jargon, it would all have come to nothing but a heap of useless words. If I could have pictured myself in her circumstances, imagined myself with her beliefs and obsessions, empathised until I could anticipate her every word, her every decision, then I still would not have understood so much as a single moment when she closed her eyes, forgot her past, wanted nothing, and simply was.

もしも彼女が自分の精神状態について続けざまに解説してくれたとしても、最新の精神力学の専門用語を使った、彼女の行動理由についての週に一度の調査があったとしても、それは意味のない言葉の山にしかならないだろう。もしもぼくに彼女自身の状況においてのぼく自身の姿を思い描くことができたり、彼女の信念や思い込みによるぼく自身の姿を想像することができたり、彼女の言葉や意志を予期できるようになるまで彼女に共感できたとしても、一瞬でさえも彼女を理解することはできないだろう。彼女が目を閉じ、過去のことを考えずに、なにも求めず、単にそのままでいる時には。

 

Of course, most of the time, nothing could have mattered less. We were happy enough together, whether or not we were strangers - and whether or not my "happiness" and Sian's "happiness" were in any real sense the same.

もちろん、ほとんどの場合そんなことが問題になることはなかった。ぼくたちは一緒にいて十分幸せだった。たとえ、二人が見知らぬもの同士であっても、そうでなくても。たとえ、ぼくの“幸せ”とシアンの“幸せ”がある意味で同じであっても、違っていても。

Over the years, she became less self-contained, more open. She had no great dark secrets to share, no traumatic childhood ordeals to recount, but she let me in on her petty fears and her mundane neuroses. I did the same, and even, clumsily, explained my peculiar obsession. She wasn't at all offended. Just puzzled.

年月が経つにつれて、シアンには含むところがなくなり、もっと明け透けにふるまうようになった。彼女には分かちあわなければいけないようなひどい心の闇や、語るべき幼年時代のトラウマ的な経験もなかった。だけどちょっとした恐怖の感情やありふれたノイローゼを打ち明けてくれたのだ。ぼくも同じことをして、その上、うまくは言えなかったけれど、自分の奇特な強迫観念も説明してみた。彼女は何も怒らなかった。ただ当惑した。

"What could it actually mean, though? To know what it's like to be someone else? You'd have to have their memories, their personality, their body - everything. And then you'd just be them, not yourself, and you wouldn't know anything. It's nonsense."

「一体それにどんな意味があるっていうの?誰か他の人になるのを知るってことに。あなたはその人の記憶や人格、肉体、つまり全てを手に入れないといけなくなるわ。そして、そんなことをすればあなたは自分じゃなくて単にその人になってしまう。あなたは何もわからないまま。ナンセンスよ」

I shrugged. "Not necessarily. Of course, perfect knowledge would be impossible, but you can always get closer. Don't you think that the more things we do together, the more experiences we share, the closer we become?"

ぼくは肩をすくめた。「そこまでする必要はないよ。もちろん完全な知識を得るのは不可能に決まってる。でも、いつだってもっと近づくことはできるんだ。もしも、ぼくたちが一緒にできることがもっとあるとしたら、もっとたくさんの体験を共有できるし、もっともっと親密になれる。そうは思わないか?」

She scowled. "Yes, but that's not what you were talking about five seconds ago. Two years, or two thousand years, of 'shared experiences' seen through different eyes means nothing. However much time two people spent together, how could you know that there was even the briefest instant when they both experienced what they were going through 'together' in the same way?"

彼女は顔をしかめて、「ええ、でも、それって五秒前に口にしたことじゃないでしょ。二年だろうと二千年だろうと違う目を通して見た“共有体験”には意味がないわ。二人の人間がとても長い間一緒に過ごしたとして、彼らが両方とも同じように“共に”体験をしたというハッキリとした瞬間があったとしても、あなたにそのことがどれほどわかるっていうの?」

"I know, but . . ."

「いや、そうだけど……」

"If you admit that what you want is impossible, maybe you'll stop fretting about it."

「自分のしたいことが不可能だと認めることができたら、それでイライラすることはなくるかもね」

I laughed. "Whatever makes you think I'm as rational as that?"

ぼくは笑って、「どうしてぼくがそこまで合理主義者だと思うんだよ?」

 

When the technology became available it was Sian's idea, not mine, for us to try out all the fashionable somatic permutations. Sian was always impatient to experience something new. "If we really are going to live forever," she said, "we'd better stay curious if we want to stay sane."

技術的に可能になったときに、大流行の肉体交換の順列組み合わせ全てをやろうと言ったのはシアンの思いつきだった。ぼくのじゃない。シアンはいつだって何か新しいことを経験したくてたまらないのだ。「本気で永遠に生きようとするのなら」彼女は言った。「正気のままでいるには好奇心旺盛でいなくっちゃ」

I was reluctant, but any resistance I put up seemed hypocritical. Clearly, this game wouldn't lead to the perfect knowledge I longed for (and knew I would never achieve), but I couldn't deny the possibility that it might be one crude step in the right direction.

ぼくはあまり気乗りしなかった。だからといって拒否をするのも偽善的に思えた。こんなゲームではぼくが長年思い焦がれている完全な知識にはとうてい到達できないだろう(そして、ぼくはそれが決して手に入れられないとわかっている)。だけど、もしかしたらこれこそ、もどかしくとも正しい方向へ進む一歩だという可能性も否定できない。

First, we exchanged bodies. I discovered what it was like to have breasts and a vagina - what it was like for me, that is, not what it had been like for Sian. True, we stayed swapped long enough for the shock, and even the novelty, to wear off, but I never felt that I'd gained much insight into her experience of the body she'd been born with. My jewel was modified only as much as was necessary to allow me to control this unfamiliar machine, which was scarcely more than would have been required to work another male body. The menstrual cycle had been abandoned decades before, and although I could have taken the necessary hormones to allow myself to have periods, and even to become pregnant (although the financial disincentives for reproduction had been drastically increased in recent years), that would have told me absolutely nothing about Sian, who had done neither.

まず最初に、ぼくたちは肉体を入れ替えた。それでぼくには自分が乳房やヴァギナを持つということがどういうことなのか、よくわかったーーぼくにとってどういうことかであって、シアンにとってどうだったかじゃない。もちろん、ぼくたちは服を脱ぐたびにショックや、新奇ささえ感じるのに十分な ほど長く体を入れ換えていたのだけれど、ぼくが彼女の生まれ持った身体で彼女の体験について十分なほどの洞察を得ることができたと思ったことは一度もなかった。ぼくの宝石が調整されているのは、不慣れな機械をコントロールできるようになる必要があるのと同じというだけのことだし、それはべつの男性の身体を動かすのに必要なもの以上のことであることはほとんどない。月経周期は何十年も前に止められていたけれど、それでも必要なホルモンを採ればぼくは生理になれるし、妊娠することだってできる(もっとも、生殖には金銭的な抑止要因があって、近年劇的に高まっていた)。でもそんなことをしてもシアンのことは何もわからないままだろう。彼女はそのどちらもしていなかった。

As for sex, the pleasure of intercourse still felt very much the same- which was hardly surprising, since nerves from the vagina and clitoris were simply wired into my jewel as if they'd come from my penis. Even being penetrated made less difference than I'd expected;unless I made a special effort to remain aware of our respective geometries, I found it hard to care who was doing what to whom. Orgasms were better though, I had to admit.

セックスでは、性交の快楽は以前とまったく同じに感じられた。驚くほどのことじゃない。ヴァギナとクリトリスから来る神経がペニスから来るもののように宝石の中で単に結びつけられているだけのことだ。つらぬかれることでさえ、想像していたものとそれほど違いはなかった。もしお互いの位置関係を注意しておくような特別な努力をしていなかったら、誰が誰に何をしているのか考えるのは難しかったと思う。でもオーガズムは素晴らしかった。これは認めなくてはなるまい。

At work, no one raised an eyebrow when I turned up as Sian, since many of my colleagues had already been through exactly the same thing. The legal definition of identity had recently been shifted from the DNA fingerprint of the body, according to a standard set of markers, to the serial number of the jewel. When even the law can keep up with you, you know you can't be doing anything very radical or profound.

職場では、ぼくがシアンに変わったからといって誰も眉ひとつ上げなかった。なぜなら同僚の多くがもうまったく同じことを経験ずみだったからだ。法的なアイデンティティの定義は最近になって肉体のDNA指紋からメーカーの標準規定による宝石のシリアルナンバーへと変更されていた。法律というものが時代の変化についていく限り、まったく過激なものにも、まったく難解なものにもなることなどできないということをぼくは知っているべきだった。

After three months, Sian had had enough. "I never realised how clumsy you were," she said. "Or that ejaculation was so dull."

三ヶ月がたって、シアンにはもう十分だったのだろう、「あなたがこんなにも下手だったとは思わなかったわ」彼女は言った。「それとも射精がとってもつまらないせいかしら」

Next, she had a clone of herself made, so we could both be women. Brain-damaged replacement bodies - Extras - had once been incredibly expensive, when they'd needed to be grown at virtually the normal rate, and kept constantly active so they'd be healthy enough to use. However, the physiological effects of the passage of time, and of exercise, don't happen by magic; at a deep enough level, there's always a biochemical signal produced, which can ultimately be faked. Mature Extras, with sturdy bones and perfect muscle tone, could now be produced from scratch in a year - four months' gestation and eight months' coma - which also allowed them to be more thoroughly brain-dead than before, soothing the ethical qualms of those who'd always wondered just how much was going on inside the heads of the old, active versions.

次にシアンが自分のクローンを造ったので、今度はぼくたち両方が女性になった。脳損傷代替用身体――エクストラ――はかつては信じられないほど高くついた。通常の割合で成長していると見せかける必要があったり、使用に耐える健康体にしておくため、常に活性化しておく必要があった頃のことだ。だけど経年や運動による生理学的な効果は魔法で起きるわけじゃない。ある程度下位レベルでの生化学的な信号が出ているのであって、それらは完全に欺すことができる。成熟したエクストラはいまやまったくのゼロから、一年の間――四ヶ月の創製期間と八ヶ月の昏睡期間――で創り出すことができるし、以前よりももっと完璧に脳死状態におけるようになった。おかげで、自分の前の、活動しているバージョンの頭のなかでどれほどのことが起こっているのだろうといつも考えている人たちは、倫理的なとがめの感情にさいなやまれずにすむ。

In our first experiment, the hardest part for me had always been, not looking in the mirror and seeing Sian, but looking at Sian and seeing myself. I'd missed her, far more than I'd missed being myself. Now, I was almost happy for my body to be absent (in storage, kept alive by a jewel based on the minimal brain of an Extra). The symmetry of being her twin appealed to me; surely now we were closer than ever. Before, we'd merely swapped our physical differences. Now, we'd abolished them.

最初の体験で、ぼくにとって一番つらかったところは、鏡を見てそこにシアンを見てしまうことではなくて、シアンを見てそこに自分自身を見てしまうことだった。ぼくは自分が自分を失ったということ以上に、彼女を失っていたのがつらかった。今、ぼくは自分の身体がなくても(貯蔵施設で、エクストラの宝石による最小限の脳を使って生かされ続けている)かなり幸せだった。自分が彼女の双子としているという対称性をぼくは気に入った。もちろん今のぼくたちは以前よりも親密になれたからだ。最初のは単にぼくたちの身体の違いを入れ替えただけだった。今、ぼくたちはそれを捨て去ったのだ。

The symmetry was an illusion. I'd changed gender, and she hadn't. I was with the woman I loved; she lived with a walking parody of herself.

この対称性は幻想だった。ぼくは性別を変え、シアンはそうしていない。ぼくは愛する女性とともに、彼女は自分自身の歩くパロディーとともに暮らしていたのだ。

One morning she woke me, pummelling my breasts so hard that she left bruises. When I opened my eyes and shielded myself, she peered at me suspiciously. "Are you in there? Michael? I'm going crazy. I want you back."

ある朝、彼女がぼくの胸をあざが残るほど強く叩いたので目が醒めた。目を開けて身を守ると、彼女はぼくのことをジロジロと疑いの目で眺め、「そこにいるの?マイケル?どうにかなりそう。戻ってきてよ

For the sake of getting the whole bizarre episode over and done with for good - and perhaps also to discover for myself what Sian had just been through - I agreed to the third permutation. There was no need to wait a year; my Extra had been grown at the same time as hers.

こんなばかげたエピソードはさっさと終わらせて、いい想い出にするために――そして多分、ぼく自身がシアンの体験したことを知るためにも――ぼくは三つめの組合せを行うことに同意した。一年も待つ必要はなかった。ぼくのエクストラは、彼女のエクストラと同時に育成されていたからだ。

Somehow, it was far more disorienting to be confronted by "myself" without the camouflage of Sian's body. I found my own face unreadable;when we'd both been in disguise, that hadn't bothered me, but now it made me feel edgy, and at times almost paranoid, for no rational reason at all.

どういうわけだか、シアンの身体を身にまとっていない“ぼく自身”と向き合うのは非常に不思議な感覚だった。ぼくには自分自身の表情が読めないのだ。ぼくたち両方ともが姿を変えていたときはそのことに悩むことはなかったのだけど、今ぼくはイライラした気持ちになるし、ほとんどパラノイアにすらなる。筋の通った理由など何もないのに。

Sex took some getting used to. Eventually, I found it pleasurable, in a confusing and vaguely narcissistic way. The compelling sense of equality I'd felt, when we'd made love as women, never quite returned to me as we sucked each other's cocks - but then, when we'd both been women, Sian had never claimed to feel any such thing. It had all been my own invention.

セックスはいくらか以前と同じものに戻りつつあった。最終的には、それを気持ちいいとさえ思った。混乱した、かすかに自己愛的な考えではあったけれど。女性同士として愛し合ったときに感じたような、ぼくたちは等しくなくてはならないという気持ちは、お互いのペニスを吸いあっているときにもまったく戻ってこないというわけではなかった。けれども、ぼくたちが二人とも女性だったとき、シアンはそんなことを感じたなんてちっとも言わなかった。これもぼくが一人で作り上げたものだったのだ。

The day after we returned to the way we'd begun (well, almost - in fact, we put our decrepit, twenty-six-year-old bodies in storage, and took up residence in our healthier Extras), I saw a story from Europe on an option we hadn't yet tried, tipped to become all the rage:hermaphroditic identical twins. Our new bodies could be our biological children (give or take the genetic tinkering required to ensure hermaphroditism), with an equal share of characteristics from both of us. We would both have changed gender, both have lost partners. We'd be equal in every way.

最初の状態に戻ったある日(おっと、本当は、ほぼ最初の状態だ。ぼくたちは老いぼれた二十六歳の身体を保管しておいて、より健康なエクストラのほうに引越していた)、ぼくはヨーロッパからの、大流行しているらしいまだ試していないオプションについての話を読んでいた。両性具有の一卵性双生児についてだ。今度の新しい身体は自分たちの生物学的な子どもで、二人の特徴を全て共通して持っているようなものになる。ぼくたちは両方とも性別が変わり、両方ともパートナーを失うことになる。ぼくたちは全ての意味で等しくなるのだ。

I took a copy of the file home to Sian. She watched it thoughtfully, then said, "Slugs are hermaphrodites, aren't they? They hang in mid-air together on a thread of slime. I'm sure there's even something in Shakespeare, remarking on the glorious spectacle of copulating slugs. Imagine it: you and me, making slug love."

ぼくはそのファイルのコピーを取り寄せ、シアンに見せた。彼女は思慮深く眺めてから言った。「ナメクジって両性具有じゃなかった?粘液の糸の上、空中で覆いかぶさりあうの。確かシェイクスピアもなにか睦みあうナメクジの壮大な光景について書いていたはずよ。想像して、あなたとわたし、ナメクジ式の愛を交わすの」

I fell on the floor, laughing.

ぼくはおかしくて床にころげ回った。

I stopped, suddenly. "Where, in Shakespeare? I didn't think you'd even read Shakespeare.

だけど突然固まった。「シェイクスピアのどこに?きみがシェイクスピアを読んでいたなんて思わなかったな」

 

Eventually, I came to believe that with each passing year, I knew Sian a little better - in the traditional sense, the sense that most couples seemed to find sufficient. I knew what she expected from me, I knew how not to hurt her. We had arguments, we had fights, but there must have been some kind of underlying stability, because in the end we always chose to stay together. Her happiness mattered to me, very much, and at times I could hardly believe that I'd ever thought it possible that all of her subjective experience might be fundamentally alien to me. It was true that every brain, and hence every jewel, was unique - but there was something extravagant in supposing that the nature of consciousness could be radically different between individuals, when the same basic hardware, and the same basic principles of neural topology, were involved.

結局のところ、ぼくは年月を重ねるうちに、ちょっとはシアンのことがわかるようになっていたのだと思う。これは伝統的な意味で、つまり多くのカップルたちが十分だと感じるというぐらいの意味で、だ。ぼくは彼女が自分に何を期待してるのかわかるし、どうやれば彼女を傷つけずに済むかもわかる。ぼくたちは口論もしたし、何度か喧嘩もした。でも、そこにはある種の安定性というものがあったにちがいない。最後には必ず二人は一緒になるのだ。ぼくにとって彼女が幸せであることはとても重要なことで、自分がかつて、彼女の主観的な経験は全てぼくとは基本的に相容れないものだと思っていたなんてとても信じがたい。あらゆる脳は、つまり、あらゆる宝石は唯一無二のものだというのは真実だ。だけど、同じ基礎ハードウェアと、同じ神経トポロジーの基本定理が複雑に絡み合っているせいで、意識の本質というものが個人の間で原理的に異なっているとするのなら、そこにはまだ何か人知の及ばないものがあるのだろう。

Still. Sometimes, if I woke in the night, I'd turn to her and whisper, inaudibly, compulsively, "I don't know you. I have no idea who, or what, you are." I'd lie there, and think about packing and leaving. I was alone, and it was farcical to go through the charade of pretending otherwise.

だけど。時々、夜中に目が覚めると、ぼくは彼女のほうを向いてこうささやく。声に出さずに、強迫観念めいて。「ぼくはきみを知らない。きみが誰なのか、何なのか、わからないんだ」。ぼくは横たわりながら、荷物をまとめて出ていくことを考える。ぼくは孤独だ。そして他人のふりをするという見せかけを続けていくことは茶番劇なのだ。

Then again, sometimes I woke in the night, absolutely convinced that I was dying, or something else equally absurd. In the sway of some half-forgotten dream, all manner of confusion is possible. It never meant a thing, and by morning I was always myself again.

そしてまた、夜中に目が覚めると、自分が死にかかっているとか、それと同じくらい馬鹿なことを完璧に信じこむ。もう忘れかけている夢の影響で、あらゆるタイプの混乱が起こりうるのだ。だけど、それは決して意味をなさず、朝にはまたいつもの自分に戻っている。

 

When I saw the story on Craig Bentley's service - he called it "research," but his "volunteers" paid for the privilege of taking part in his experiments - I almost couldn't bring myself to include it in the bulletin, although all my professional judgement told me it was everything our viewers wanted in a thirty second techno-shock piece:bizarre, even mildly disconcerting, but not too hard to grasp.

ぼくがクレイグ・ベントレーの事業――彼は「研究」と呼んでいたが、「志願者」は彼の実験のなかで特別な地位を与えられるのだ――の話を読んだとき、これをニュース速報のひとつにするつもりはほとんどなかった。だけど自分の職業的判断はこう告げていた。これには視聴者たちが三十秒間のテクノショックな小品に求めているものが全てある、と。それは奇妙で、すこしばかりまごつかされるが、難解すぎてわけがわからないというほどではないものだ。

Bentley was a cyberneurologist; he studied the Ndoli Device, in the way that neurologists had once studied the brain. Mimicking the brain with a neural-net computer had not required a profound understanding of its higher-level structures; research into these structures continued, in their new incarnation. The jewel, compared to the brain, was of course both easier to observe, and easier to manipulate.

ベントレーは電脳神経学者だ。彼はエンドーリ装置を研究している。ちょうど神経学者がかつて脳を研究していたように。神経網コンピュータで脳を模倣するにはその高次の構造を理解する必要はないが、研究自体は生まれ変わった形で続いているのだ。宝石は脳と比較してもちろん観察しやすいし、操作もより簡単だ。

In his latest project, Bentley was offering couples something slightly more up-market than an insight into the sex lives of slugs. He was offering them eight hours with identical minds.

最新のプロジェクトで彼は、カップルたちにナメクジ式性生活の体験よりもうすこし高級なものを提供している。彼が提供するのは八時間の同一精神だ。

I made a copy of the original, ten-minute piece that had come through on the fibre, then let my editing console select the most titillating thirty seconds possible, for broadcast. It did a good job; it had learnt from me.

ぼくは光ファイバーを通ってやってきた十分間の作品のコピーをとると、放送するために編集コンソールを使って一番刺激的な三十秒間を選び出した。とてもうまくいった。コンソールはぼくのやりかたを学習しているからだ。

I couldn't lie to Sian. I couldn't hide the story, I couldn't pretend to be disinterested. The only honest thing to do was to show her the file, tell her exactly how I felt, and ask her what she wanted.

ぼくはシアンには嘘がつけない。話を隠し通すことなんてできない。興味がないふりなんてできない。正直なやりかたはたった一つ。彼女にファイルをみせて、自分がどう感じたか全部話して、彼女はどうしたいか尋ねるのだ。

I did just that. When the HV image faded out, she turned to me, shrugged, and said mildly, "Okay. It sounds like fun. Let's try it."

ぼくはそうした。HV映像が消えたとき、彼女は僕に向きなおり、肩をすくめてやさしく言った。「オーケー。面白そうね。やってみましょう」

Bentley wore a T-shirt with nine computer-drawn portraits on it, in a three-by-three grid. Top left was Elvis Presley. Bottom right was Marilyn Monroe. The rest were various stages in between.

ベントレーが着ていたTシャツには九つのコンピュータ描画の肖像画が3×3の枠の中におさまっていた。左上がエルビス・プレスリー、右下がマリリン・モンロー。残りはその中間段階だ。

"This is how it will work. The transition will take twenty minutes, during which time you'll be disembodied. Over the first ten minutes, you'll gain equal access to each other's memories. Over the second ten minutes, you'll both be moved, gradually, towards the compromise personality.

「これがこの仕組みだ。推移には二十分かかり、その間身体からは切り離される。最初の十分間はお互いの記憶にアクセスすることができる。次の十分間で二人ともを統合した人格に向かって段階的に移動させる」

"Once that's done, your Ndoli Devices will be identical - in the sense that both will have all the same neural connections with all the same weighting factors - but they'll almost certainly be in different states. I'll have to black you out, to correct that. Then you'll wake- "

「移動ができてしまえば、エンドーリ装置は同じものになる。二人ともまったく同じ神経接続網と同じ重みづけ要素を持っているという意味でだ。だが、この時点ではほぼ確実にその状態は異なっているだろう。わたしは君たちをブラックアウトさせてこれを修正する。その後、君たちが目を覚ますのは――」

Who'll wake?

誰が目を覚ますって?

" - in identical electromechanical bodies. Clones can't be made sufficiently alike.

「――二つのそっくりな機械の身体の中だ。クローンはうまく同じように作れないのでね」

"You'll spend the eight hours alone, in perfectly matched rooms. Rather like hotel suites, really. You'll have HV to keep you amused if you need it - without the videophone module, of course. You might think you'd both get an engaged signal, if you tried to call the same number simultaneously - but in fact, in such cases the switching equipment arbitrarily lets one call through, which would make your environments different."

「そこで八時間一人で過ごす。完璧に調和した部屋のなかでだ。実際、ホテルのスイートみたいなところだよ。必要ならHV映像をみて過ごしてもかまわないが、もちろん機械から映話機能は抜いてある。たぶんこう思ったんじゃないかな。二人とも同じ番号に同時に映話するから、二人ともが話し中になるんじゃないかって。でも実際には、こんな場合でも切替え装置がうまく働いて電話がつながるんだよ。そうなると環境が変わってしまうかもしれないからね」

Sian asked, "Why can't we phone each other? Or better still, meet each other? If we're exactly the same, we'd say the same things, do the same things - we'd be one more identical part of each other's environment."

シアンが尋ねた。「二人で話すこともできませんか?もっといいのは二人で会うことですが、それも駄目ですか?わたしたちがまったく同じだというのなら、同じことを言うはずですし、同じことをするはずです。わたしたちはお互いの環境の同じ一部分になるはずです」

Bentley pursed his lips and shook his head. "Perhaps I'll allow something of the kind in a future experiment, but for now I believe it would be too . . . potentially traumatic."

ベントレーは唇をすぼめ、首を振った。「今後の実験ではその手のことをなにかしら許可するつもりだよ。だけど、今のところわたしはそういうのは多分……潜在的にトラウマを引き起こすかもしれないと考えているんだ」

Sian gave me a sideways glance, which meant: This man is a killjoy.

シアンはぼくをチラリと見た。こう言ってるのだ。「こいつはつまらないやつ」

"The end will be like the beginning, in reverse. First, your personalities will be restored. Then, you'll lose access to each other's memories. Of course, your memories of the experience itself will be left untouched. Untouched by me, that is; I can't predict how your separate personalities, once restored, will act - filtering, suppressing, reinterpreting those memories. Within minutes, you may end up with very different ideas about what you've been through. All I can guarantee is this: For the eight hours in question, the two of you will be identical."

「終わりは始まりを逆さまにしたのに似ている。最初に人格が復元される。次にお互いの記憶にアクセスすることができなくなる。もちろん体験した記憶自体は元のままだよ。ただし、わたしは元のままにしておくけれど、復元された人格がどんなふうに振る舞うか、つまり、どんなふうに記憶をフィルタリングしたり抑圧したり再解釈したりするかはわたしにも予測できない。しばらくしたら体験したことについてまったく違った考えを持つようになるかもしれないよ。わたしが保証できるのはこれだけだ。問題の八時間のあいだ、君たち二人は同一になる

We talked it over. Sian was enthusiastic, as always. She didn't much care what it would be like; all that really mattered to her was collecting one more novel experience. ぼくたちは話し合った。シアンはいつも通り熱狂していた。彼女はそれがどうなるかあまり気にしていないのだ。彼女にとって問題なのはまた新奇な体験ができるかどうかなのだから。

"Whatever happens, we'll be ourselves again at the end of it," she said. "What's there to be afraid of? You know the old Ndoli joke."

「何が起ころうとも、わたしたちは最後には元の自分にもどれるのよ」彼女は言った。「何を怖がることがあるの?古いエンドーリのジョークは知ってるでしょ」

"What old Ndoli joke?"

「古いエンドーリのジョーク?」

"Anything's bearable - so long as it's finite."

「どんなことだって耐えられる。それがいつか終わるのなら」

I couldn't decide how I felt. The sharing of memories notwithstanding, we'd both end up knowing, not each other, but merely a transient, artificial third person. Still, for the first time in our lives, we would have been through exactly the same experience, from exactly the same point of view - even if the experience was only spending eight hours locked in separate rooms, and the point of view was that of a genderless robot with an identity crisis.

ぼくは自分がどう感じているのかわからなかった。記憶の共有に耐えられれば、ぼくたち二人はとうとう知り合うことができる。お互いを、ではなくて、ただの一時的な人工の第三者を、ではあるけれど。でも、二人の生活がはじまってからはじめて、ぼくたちは完璧にまったく同じ体験を、完璧にまったく同じ視点ですることになるのだ。たとえ、その体験が別々の部屋に八時間閉じ込められて過ごすことであっても。たとえ、その視点が性別がなく、アイデンティティの危機にあるロボットのものであっても。

It was a compromise - but I could think of no realistic way in which it could have been improved.

これは妥協案だ。だけど、ぼくにはこれ以上前進しそうな現実的なやり方は思いつかなかった。

I called Bentley, and made a reservation.

ぼくはベントレーに映話し、予約をとった。

 

In perfect sensory deprivation, my thoughts seemed to dissipate into the blackness around me before they were even half-formed. This isolation didn't last long, though; as our short-term memories merged, we achieved a kind of telepathy: One of us would think a message, and the other would "remember" thinking it, and reply in the same way.

完全な感覚喪失の最中においては、ぼくの思考は半分も定まる前に周囲の暗黒のなかに消失してしまうようだった。でも、この隔離状態は長くはなかった。短期記憶が合わさっていくにつれて、ぼくたちは一種のテレパシーができるようになった。一方が言葉を考えると、もう一方はそう考えたことを<思い出す>。そして同じやりかたで返答もできる。

- I really can't wait to uncover all your grubby little secrets.

――いやらしい秘密がみんな明らかになるのが待ちきれないわ。

- I think you're going to be disappointed. Anything I haven't already told you, I've probably repressed.

――きっと失望すると思うよ。まだ話していないことは多分心理的に抑圧されるだろうから。

- Ah, but repressed is not erased. Who knows what will turn up?

――ええ、でも抑圧消し去ることじゃないわ。なにが出てくるかなんて誰にわかるの?

- We'll know, soon enough.

――ぼくたちにさ。もうすぐにね。

I tried to think of all the minor sins I must have committed over the years, all the shameful, selfish, unworthy thoughts, but nothing came into my head but a vague white noise of guilt. I tried again, and achieved, of all things, an image of Sian as a child. A young boy slipping his hand between her legs, then squealing with fright and pulling away. But she'd described that incident to me, long ago. Was it her memory, or my reconstruction?

ぼくは何年も前にやったちっぽけな罪を思い出そうとしてみた。まったく恥ずべき、自己中心的で、くだらない考えだ。だけど、罪のぼんやりとしたホワイトノイズ以外は何も思いつかない。もう一度やってみると、その中から出て来たのはシアンの子どものころのイメージだ。小さな男の子が彼女の足の間に手を滑らせ、それからギャッと叫んで逃げていく。でも彼女はかなり昔にこの事件のことをぼくに話してくれていた。じゃあこれは彼女の記憶なのか?それともぼくが再構成した記憶なのか?

- My memory. I think. Or perhaps my reconstruction. You know, half the time when I've told you something that happened before we met, the memory of the telling has become far clearer to me than the memory itself. Almost replacing it.

――わたしの記憶、だと思う。それともたぶんわたしが再構成したのね。わかると思うけど、あなたにわたしたちが出会う以前のことを話せば、わたしにとってはその記憶そのものよりも、話したという記憶のほうが明確になってしまうのよ。ほとんど入れ替わってしまうぐらい。

- It's the same for me.

――それはぼくにとっても同じことだよ。

- Then in a way, our memories have already been moving towards a kind of symmetry, for years. We both remember what was said, as if we'd both heard it from someone else.

――じゃあ、ある意味でわたしたちの記憶はもう何年もかけてある種の対称形をとるように変化していたのね。わたしたちは自分が言ったことを、まるで他の誰かから聞いたことのように思い出すんだわ。

Agreement. Silence. A moment of confusion. Then:

同意。沈黙。困惑の瞬間。そして――

- This neat division of "memory" and "personality" Bentley uses; is it really so clear? Jewels are neural-net computers; you can't talk about "data" and "program" in any absolute sense.

――ベントレーが言っていたような、わかりやすい「記憶」と「人格」の境界だけど、これって本当にそんなに明確なものなのかな。だって宝石は神経網コンピュータだけど、どうあれ絶対的な意味では「データ」と「プログラム」について語ることなんてできないじゃないか。

- Not in general, no. His classification must be arbitrary, to some extent. But who cares?

――一般的にはそうね。彼の類別法はある程度、独断によるものに違いないわ。でもそれが何だと言うの?

- It matters. If he restores "personality," but allows "memories" to persist, a misclassification could leave us . . .

――重大だよ。彼が「人格」を復元しようとして、「記憶」を残すようにしたとすると、類別から漏れたものが消えてしまう……

- What?

――それって?

- It depends, doesn't it? At one extreme, so thoroughly "restored," so completely unaffected, that the whole experience might as well not have happened. And at the other extreme . . .

――場合によると思う。ひとつの極端の場合は、記憶がまったく完全に「復元」されて何の変化もないせいで、経験したことは全て何も起こらなかったことになるかもしれない。そして、もうひとつの極端な場合は……

- Permanently . . .

――永久に……

- . . . closer.

――……親密でいられる。

- Isn't that the point?

――で、要はどうなるの?

- I don't know anymore.

――これ以上はわからないよ。

Silence. Hesitation.

沈黙。ためらい。

Then I realised that I had no idea whether or not it was my turn to reply.

そしてぼくは自分が答える番なのか返答する番なのかわからなくなっていた。

 

I woke, lying on a bed, mildly bemused, as if waiting for a mental hiatus to pass. My body felt slightly awkward, but less so than when I'd woken in someone else's Extra. I glanced down at the pale, smooth plastic of my torso and legs, then waved a hand in front of my face. I looked like a unisex shop-window dummy - but Bentley had shown us the bodies beforehand, it was no great shock. I sat up slowly, then stood and took a few steps. I felt a little numb and hollow, but my kinaesthetic sense, my proprioception, was fine; I felt located between my eyes, and I felt that this body was mine. As with any modern transplant, my jewel had been manipulated directly to accommodate the change, avoiding the need for months of physiotherapy.

目が覚めた。ベッドに横たって少しぼんやりとして、まるで精神の中断が過ぎ去るのを待っているようだった。身体はすこしぎこちなく感じたけれど、他の誰かのエクストラで目覚めたときほどじゃない。青白くてなめらかなプラスティック製の胴体や足腰を見下ろし、手を顔の前で振ってみた。ぼくはちょうど男女共用のマネキン人形みたいだった。でも、ベントレーから事前にこの身体を見せてもらっていたので、それほど驚きはしない。ぼくはゆっくり起き上がると、立って数歩あるいてみた。すこし鈍くてうつろに感じたけど、運動知覚も自己受容感覚も良好なようだ。ぼくは自分自身を両目の中間にあるように位置づけできているし、この身体を自分のものだと感じている。他の現代的な移植と同じように、変化に適応できるようぼくの宝石は直接操作されている。おかげで何ヶ月間も物理療法をする必要はない。

I glanced around the room. It was sparsely furnished: one bed, one table, one chair, one clock, one HV set. On the wall, a framed reproduction of an Escher lithograph: "Bond of Union," a portrait of the artist and, presumably, his wife, faces peeled like lemons into helices of rind, joined into a single, linked band. I traced the outer surface from start to finish, and was disappointed to find that it lacked the Mobius twist I was expecting.

ぼくは部屋を見回した。まばらに家具がおいてある。ベッドひとつ、テーブルひとつ、椅子ひとつ、時計ひとつ、HVセットひとつ。壁にあるのは額縁に入ったエッシャーのリソグラフ「Bond of Union*1」の複製だ。画家とおそらくは彼の妻、二人の肖像画が向かい合い、レモンの皮のように外観をらせん状に剥かれ、一本の帯で繋がっている。ぼくは外側の表面を最初から最後までたどっていったが、期待していたようなメビウスの輪はないということがわかって、がっかりした。

No windows, one door without a handle. Set into the wall beside the bed, a full-length mirror. I stood a while and stared at my ridiculous form. It suddenly occurred to me that, if Bentley had a real love of symmetry games, he might have built one room as the mirror image of the other, modified the HV set accordingly, and altered one jewel, one copy of me, to exchange right for left. What looked like a mirror could then be nothing but a window between the rooms. I grinned awkwardly with my plastic face; my reflection looked appropriately embarrassed by the sight. The idea appealed to me, however unlikely it was. Nothing short of an experiment in nuclear physics could reveal the difference. No, not true; a pendulum free to precess, like Foucault's, would twist the same way in both rooms, giving the game away. I walked up to the mirror and thumped it. It didn't seem to yield at all, but then, either a brick wall, or an equal and opposite thump from behind, could have been the explanation.

窓はなし。ノブのないドアひとつ。ベッドの側の壁には全身を写せる鏡があった。ぼくはちょっと立って自分の馬鹿げた格好を眺めてみた。そのとき突然ひらめいたのだが、もしベントレーが対称性のゲームを本当に愛しているのなら、彼は部屋をもう一方の部屋の鏡像になるようにあつらえなくてはならなかっただろう。そうなるようにHVセットを調整し、一方の宝石、つまりぼくのもう一人のコピーを改造して右と左を入れ替えるのだ。そうすればこの鏡のように見えるものはちょうど部屋を区切る窓になる。ぼくがプラスティクの顔でぎこちなく微笑むと、鏡に写ったその姿はきまりが悪そうに見えた。この考えはどれほどありえないとしても気に入った。ちょっとした核物理の実験でもしなければ、二つ部屋の違いはわからなくなるだろう。いや、これは正しくない。歳差運動ができるような振り子(フーコーの振り子)なら、両方の部屋で同じ方向にねじれてしまって、このゲームをおじゃんにしてしまうからだ。ぼくは鏡のところに歩いていくと、右手でコツンと叩いてみた。これで何がわかるわけでもないけれど、とにかくこの後ろにはレンガの壁か、鏡の後ろから叩く手(右手でも左手でも)のどちらかがある、というわけだ。

I shrugged and turned away. Bentley might have done anything - for all I knew, the whole set-up could have been a computer simulation. My body was irrelevant. The room was irrelevant. The point was . . .

ぼくは肩をすくめて部屋に向き直った。ベントレーがなにかしらやっているのかもしれない。思いつく限りでは、このセット全てがコンピュータのシミュレーションだということもありうる。この身体は関係ない。この部屋にも関係ない。大事なのは……

I sat on the bed. I recalled someone - Michael, probably - wondering if I'd panic when I dwelt upon my nature, but I found no reason to do so. If I'd woken in this room with no recent memories, and tried to sort out who I was from my past(s), I'd no doubt have gone mad, but I knew exactly who I was, I had two long trails of anticipation leading to my present state. The prospect of being changed back into Sian or Michael didn't bother me at all; the wishes of both to regain their separate identities endured in me, strongly, and the desire for personal integrity manifested itself as relief at the thought of their re-emergence, not as fear of my own demise. In any case, my memories would not be expunged, and I had no sense of having goals which one or the other of them would not pursue. I felt more like their lowest common denominator than any kind of synergistic hypermind; I was less, not more, than the sum of my parts. My purpose was strictly limited: I was here to enjoy the strangeness for Sian, and to answer a question for Michael, and when the time came I'd be happy to bifurcate, and resume the two lives I remembered and valued.

ぼくはベッドに座って、誰か――たぶんマイケル――のことを思いだした。彼は、ぼくが自分の本質のことを考えこむあまりパニックに陥ってしまうと考えるだろうか。もちろんそうなる理由などない。もしもぼくがこの部屋で最近の記憶を失くして目覚めたとして、過去の記憶から自分が何であるか見つけ出さなくてはならないとしたら、ぼくは間違いなく気が触れていただろう。でも、ぼくは自分が何者であるか正確に知っているし、こんな状態になるはずだという予測の記憶を二つも持っている。自分がシアンにもマイケルにも戻れると考えても、ぼくはちっとも苦にならない。元の別々に分かれた人格に戻りたいという思いは今も強く残っているし、自らの完全な状態を願っているということは、元に戻った時のことを考えれば安心できることであって、今の自分を喪失することへの恐れにはならないからだ。どんな場合でも、ぼくの意識が消されることはないし、そのうちのどちらかに追求しないようなゴールがあるだなんて、ぼくには理解できない。ぼくは幾何学的な超意識というものよりもむしろ意識の最小公倍数のようなものを感じている。ぼくは自分の部分の和以上のものではなく、それ以下だということだ。ぼくの目的意識は厳しく制限されているけれど、それはぼくがシアンのために奇妙さを楽しむために、そしてマイケルによって問われる問題に答えるためにここにいるからであって、時が来ればぼくは喜んで二つに別れ、心に残っている大切な二つの人生を続けるからだ。

So, how did I experience consciousness? The same way as Michael? The same way as Sian? So far as I could tell, I'd undergone no fundamental change - but even as I reached that conclusion, I began to wonder if I was in any position to judge. Did memories of being Michael, and memories of being Sian, contain so much more than the two of them could have put into words and exchanged verbally? Did I really know anything about the nature of their existence, or was my head just full of second-hand description - intimate, and detailed, but ultimately as opaque as language? If my mind were radically different, would that difference be something I could even perceive - or would all my memories, in the act of remembering, simply be recast into terms that seemed familiar?

じゃあ、ぼくはどうやって意識というものを経験しているのだろう?マイケルがやるように?シアンがやるように?自分で言える限りでは、ぼくは根本的になんの変化も経験していない。だけど、この結論にたどりついた後でも、ぼくは自分がどんな判断も下す立場にないのではないかと疑いはじめた。マイケルであるという記憶とシアンであるという記憶を持つことは、二人が言葉を交わして口頭でやりとりすることよりも大きいことなのだろうか?彼らの存在の本質について自分はなにか知っているのだろうか?それともぼくの頭は他者による間接的な記述――親しみやすく詳細だが言語と同じように完全に不透明だ――でいっぱいということなのだろうか?もしもぼくの精神が原理的に異なっているとするなら、その違いを理解することなんて出来るのだろうか?それとも記憶の過程におけるぼくの意識は、すべて単に親しみやすく思えるような言葉に入れ換えられているということなのだろうか?

The past, after all, was no more knowable than the external world. Its very existence also had to be taken on faith - and, granted existence, it too could be misleading.

結局のところ、過去というものは外の世界以上に知ることができるものではないのだ。その存在も信頼に支えられたものに違いない――そして、認められた存在、これも誤解しやすいものなのだ。

I buried my head in my hands, dejected. I was the closest they could get, and what had come of me? Michael's hope remained precisely as reasonable - and as unproven - as ever.

がっかりしてぼくは自分の手の中に顔をうずめた。ぼくはとり得る状況のなかで一番近いところにいる。ぼくのなかから何が出てくるのだろう?マイケルの望みはまったく手つかずのまま、筋の通ったものとして残っている。証明されないまま、今まで通りに。

After a while, my mood began to lighten. At least Michael's search was over, even if it had ended in failure. Now he'd have no choice but to accept that, and move on.

しばらくすると、ぼくの気分は明るくなり始めた。少なくともマイケルの探求は終わったのだ。たとえそれが失敗に終わったのだとしても。今や彼はそのことを受け入れて前に進むほか選択肢はない。

I paced around the room for a while, flicking the HV on and off. I was actually starting to get bored, but I wasn't going to waste eight hours and several thousand dollars by sitting down and watching soap operas.

ぼくはしばらく部屋をぐるぐる歩いてはHVをつけたり消したりした。実際、退屈になり始めてきたのだが、じっと座ってくだらない番組を観ることで八時間と何千ドルを無駄にするわけにはいかない。

I mused about possible ways of undermining the synchronisation of my two copies. It was inconceivable that Bentley could have matched the rooms and bodies to such a fine tolerance that an engineer worthy of the name couldn't find some way of breaking the symmetry. Even a coin toss might have done it, but I didn't have a coin. Throwing a paper plane? That sounded promising - highly sensitive to air currents - but the only paper in the room was the Escher, and I couldn't bring myself to vandalise it. I might have smashed the mirror, and observed the shapes and sizes of the fragments, which would have had the added bonus of proving or disproving my earlier speculations, but as I raised the chair over my head, I suddenly changed my mind. Two conflicting sets of short-term memories had been confusing enough during a few minutes of sensory deprivation; for several hours interacting with a physical environment, it could be completely disabling. Better to hold off until I was desperate for amusement.

ぼくは、自分の二つのコピーが同期するのを干渉できるような方法を考えはじめた。ベントレーがこの部屋と身体を、その名に値するエンジニアであっても対称性を破るような方法を見つけられないほど、きつく調整しているとはちょっと考えられない。コインを投げることでも対称性を破ることはできるけど、ぼくはコインを持ってない。紙飛行機でも飛ばそうか?これは――空気の流れの繊細さを考えれば――確実に思えた。でもこの部屋にある唯一の紙はエッシャーだ。そしてぼくは芸術を破壊する気にはなれない。鏡を叩き壊して、かけらの形と大きさを観察すればいい。そうすればこの部屋で最初に考えた推測の証明、あるいは反証をすることになるというおまけもついてくる。だけど、頭上に椅子を持ち上げたとたん、急に気が変わった。二つの短期記憶における食い違いすら何分かの感覚喪失を引き起こすのに十分だったのだ。こんなことをすれば何時間もの間、物理環境と相互にやり取りすることが完璧に出来なくなってしまうだろう。他に娯楽がなくなるまでは延期しておいたほうがよさそうだ。

So I lay down on the bed and did what most of Bentley's clients probably ended up doing.

それでぼくはベッドに横たわって、ベントレーの顧客たちがたぶんみんな最後にやるようなことをした。

As they coalesced, Sian and Michael had both had fears for their privacy - and both had issued compensatory, not to say defensive, mental declarations of frankness, not wanting the other to think that they had something to hide. Their curiosity, too, had been ambivalent;they'd wanted to understand each other, but, of course, not to pry.

自分たちが合体するときに、シアンとマイケルはともに自分のプライバシーが暴かれるのを恐れた。そして二人とも、防衛のためとは言わないまでも、それを補うように正直さの精神的な定義を持ち出した。二人の間に何か隠し事があると片方に思われたくなかったからだ。彼らの好奇心もまた二律背反なものだった。二人はお互いに理解し合いたかったのだが、もちろん、無理に覗かれたくはなかったのだ。

All of these contradictions continued in me, but - staring at the ceiling, trying not to look at the clock again for at least another thirty seconds - I didn't really have to make a decision. It was the most natural thing in the world to let my mind wander back over the course of their relationship, from both points of view.

この矛盾は全てぼくの中に引き続き残っている。だけど――天井を見つめ、次の三十秒が過ぎるまではもう一度時計を見てしまわないよう頑張ってみる――ぼくが結論を下す必要なんてまったくないのだ。二人の視点を持っているということで、ぼくがその関係の間をさまよい歩くのはまったくもって自然なことなのだから。

It was a very peculiar reminiscence. Almost everything seemed at once vaguely surprising and utterly familiar - like an extended attack of deja vu. It's not that they'd often set out deliberately to deceive each other about anything substantial, but all the tiny white lies, all the concealed trivial resentments, all the necessary, laudable, essential, loving deceptions, that had kept them together in spite of their differences, filled my head with a strange haze of confusion and disillusionment.

このことはとても特別な想い出になるだろう。ほとんど全てのものからかすかな驚きと大きな親しみを同時に感じる――ちょうどデジャビュのはじまりを引きのばしたみたいに。二人は何か実体のあるものについて、わざわざお互いに騙しあおうとしていたというわけじゃない。そうじゃなくて、ちょっとした罪のない嘘すべて、心に隠れたささいな怒りの感情すべて、必要不可欠で称賛に値する、愛情のこもったごまかしのすべて、それらが二人を一緒にいられるようにしていたのだ。ぼくの頭のなかで混乱と幻滅の奇妙な霧となってうずまく、二人の間の違いがあったにもかかわらず。

It wasn't in any sense a conversation; I was no multiple personality. Sian and Michael simply weren't there - to justify, to explain, to deceive each other all over again, with the best intentions. Perhaps I should have attempted to do all this on their behalf, but I was constantly unsure of my role, unable to decide on a position. So I lay there, paralysed by symmetry, and let their memories flow.

これはどんな意味でも会話とは呼べない。ぼくは多重人格になっていない。シアンとマイケルはただここにいないというだけだ――一生懸命、お互いに正当化しあったり、釈明しあったり、もう一度騙しあったりするような彼らは。多分、ぼくはこれらのことを代わりにやってみようと試してみるべきだったのかもしれない。でも、ぼくはずっと自分の役割がわからないし、自分の立場を決めることもできない。だからぼくは対称性に麻痺して横たわったまま、彼らの記憶が流れ出てくるのにまかせた。

After that, the time passed so quickly that I never had a chance to break the mirror.

そうしているうちに時間は瞬く間に過ぎ、ぼくに鏡を壊すチャンスはとうとう訪れなかった。

 

We tried to stay together.

ぼくたちは一緒に過ごそうとした。

We lasted a week.

一週間がたった。

Bentley had made - as the law required - snapshots of our jewels prior to the experiment. We could have gone back to them - and then had him explain to us why - but self-deception is only an easy choice if you make it in time.

ベントレーは――法律で定められた通り――実験前のぼくたちの宝石のスナップショットを取っていた。だからぼくたちはその時点まで戻ることができる(そして彼にその理由を説明させることも)。だけど、もしその場でするのなら自己欺瞞だけは簡単な選択だ。

We couldn't forgive each other, because there was nothing to forgive. Neither of us had done a single thing that the other could fail to understand, and sympathise with, completely.

ぼくたちはお互いを許せなかった。許しあうものがなかったからだ。ぼくたちのうちのどちらも相手を完全に理解しそこなったり同情しそこなったりすることはできなくなっていた。

We knew each other too well, that's all. Detail after tiny fucking microscopic detail. It wasn't that the truth hurt; it didn't, any longer. It numbed us. It smothered us. We didn't know each other as we knew ourselves; it was worse than that. In the self, the details blur in the very processes of thought; mental self-dissection is possible, but it takes great effort to sustain. Our mutual dissection took no effort at all; it was the natural state into which we fell in each other's presence. Our surfaces had been stripped away, but not to reveal a glimpse of the soul. All we could see beneath the skin were the cogs, spinning.

ぼくたちはあまりにお互いを知りすぎたのだ。それだけのこと。細部に次ぐ、くそったれな顕微鏡レベルの細部。これは真実が損なわれたということじゃない。そんなことはまったくない。ぼくたちは麻痺させられ、窒息させられたのだ。ぼくたちは自身を知るようにお互いを知ってはいなかったが、これはそれより悪い。自己においては、その詳細はまさに思考のプロセスのなかでぼやけてしまう。自分の精神を分析することはできるけれど、それをし続けるには大変な努力を強いられるのだ。でも、お互いに分析しあうのにはなんの努力もいらない。そうするのはお互いの存在にとって身についた自然な状態だからだ。ぼくたちの表装は引きはがされてしまった。だけどそれでも魂の片鱗が現れることはなかった。ぼくたちがその皮膚の下に目にすることができたのは回転する歯車だけだった。

And I knew, now, that what Sian had always wanted most in a lover was the alien, the unknowable, the mysterious, the opaque. The whole point, for her, of being with someone else was the sense of confronting otherness. Without it, she believed, you might as well be talking to yourself.

そして今、ぼくにはわかる。シアンが恋人のなかにいつも一番に求めていたものは、異質で、不可知で、神秘的で、不明瞭なものだったのだ、と。彼女にとって、誰かとともにいるということの大事なところは、他者と向き合っている感覚だったのだ。それがなければ彼女もこう思うだろう。自分自身と話しているのと同じだ、と。

I found that I now shared this view (a change whose precise origins I didn't much want to think about . . . but then, I'd always known she had the stronger personality, I should have guessed that something would rub off).

ぼくは自分もこの考えを持っていると思う(この変化がどこから生まれたものかについてはあまり考えたくない。……でも、ぼくはいつもシアンは自分よりも強固な人格をもっていると思っていたから、何かがはがれ落ちたのだと推測してもいいと思う)。

Together, we might as well have been alone, so we had no choice but to part.

一緒にいても、ぼくたちは孤独なのも同然だ。ぼくたちには別れるほか選択肢はない。

Nobody wants to spend eternity alone.

誰も永遠に孤独ではいられないのだから。

 

Originally appeared in Eidolon 8,April 1992. Copyright c 1991 Greg Egan. All rights reserved.

http://eidolon.net/?story=Closer&pagetitle=Closer&section=fiction

http://www.quarante-deux.org/recits/egan/nouvelles/pres.html

 

翻訳について 11/25 初出 12/14 グレッグ・イーガン その2 - 810 の指摘で改訳

Last modified:2004/12/14 07:23:59
Keyword(s):
References:[性犯罪ニュース]

*1 LW409.jpg